Tobacco-Free Chile launches #ISupporttheTobaccoLaw to incredible success

Sonia on Buenos Dias a TodosProducers of the TVN (Chile’s National Television) morning television show Buenos Dias a Todos last week proclaimed their support for the #YoApoyoLeyTabaco (I Support the Tobacco Law) citizen campaign. The Tobacco-Free Chile coalition, an initiative coordinated by the EPES Foundation that promotes public health policy that lowers the high rate of smoking in this country, launched the campaign Monday, August 24.

Sonia Covarrubias, Tobacco-Free Chile Coalition Coordinator and EPES Executive Secretary, was interviewed Wednesday morning on the television program. The extensive interview gave her the opportunity to call upon Chilean organizations and the population in general to support a bill that aims to bring the national law in line with the World Health Organization’s Tobacco Control Framework Agreement

After launching the citizen campaign, the television program producers contacted Sonia to appear on the show. During the course of the interview, the program’s ratings rose, prompting producers to extend the time on the set. In addition, the campaign became a Twitter Trending Topic.

The complete 51-minute interview may be viewed on TVN’s website.

Sonia described the objectives behind plain packaging and spoke about the issue of tobacco additives, refuting tobacco industry charges about an alleged black market trade. She made a point to signal that the “YoApoyoLeyTabaco” campaign is backed by the OPS, WHO, as well as 60 national and international organizations. Moreover, four former Health Ministers of Chile – Jaime Mañalich, Osvaldo Artaza, Jorge Jimenez de la Jara and Helia Molina – publicly announced their support for the measure.

Action for Health in the Americas is proud to be a key supporter of this campaign and all the other work of EPES!

In awe of EPES…plus the May 2015 Update is here!


May2015UpdateCoverHello friends of EPES and AHA!

Most of you haven’t heard from me before, but I thought I’d give Chris, our Board President, a break from writing a letter this time. As I was proofreading this EPES Update – specifically the article about EPES turning 33 – I got to thinking how absolutely amazing EPES is and felt the need to share those thoughts. While I’ve always known EPES is a year older than me, for some reason I was struck by the fact that I’m 32 and EPES is 33. It could be that now, as responsibilities in my life and career pile up, I can better appreciate what an incredible feat it is for these four women to have founded a grassroots organization in very challenging circumstances, grown it to what it is today, and still be so committed 33 years later. I’m in awe of them and all the others who have become a part of EPES since 1982.

I feel incredibly lucky to have met Karen 9 years ago and been introduced to the work of EPES, which led to me helping with the development of Action for Health in the Americas and later serving on the board. Since those of us on the board are volunteers, other responsibilities sometimes keep us from doing more, but something keeps us connected and committed to EPES even a continent away. I know the same goes for all of you. As AHA board secretary I keep the records for donations and know that many of you donate to EPES year after year (often multiple times a year) and see that your support is critical to EPES’s continued operations in Chile and has allowed us to spread their model beyond Chile.

If you’ve known EPES for a while – as most of you have – you can see how much has been accomplished when you read through this Update. I remember helping to write one of the first grant applications for the work EPES would do with tobacco control in Chile, and now EPES is presenting its accomplishments at a prominent international conference. The International Training Course now has over 110 graduates from 15 countries. And Llareta just celebrated its 30th anniversary.

Truly an inspiration to me, and hopefully, to all of you as well.

Thank you for your continued support!

Meghan Ochal

Secretary, Action for Health in the Americas Board


Happy New Year!

AHA and EPES would like to wish you all a happy 2015!

As has happened for the past five years, EPES is jumping right in and starting the year with one of its biggest undertParticipant Mapakings – the annual International Training Course in Popular Education in Health. Now in its sixth year, participants are arriving in Santiago this weekend – and will spend the next two weeks immersed in hands-on learning about community-based strategies for health that they can bring back to their own communities near and far. These participants will join the 90 graduates from 15 countries who have already gone forth from the first five trainings to spread the EPES model.

This year, EPES is excited to welcome Emmy award winninSpecial Guest Lisa Russellg documentary filmmaker and public health advocate Lisa Russell as a special guest instructor, who will highlight her film Poder! and discuss how video production can be an exercise in women’s empowerment and involving creative communities in chronicling the fight for dignity and health.

You can read more about the planned course content, the faculty, and experiences of past students here; AHA looks forward to sharing the outcomes of the course in the coming weeks!

Gift the gift of EPES this holiday season!

Read about what EPES has been up to this year – your donations are what keeps this work going!

Dec 2014 Update MapAs another holiday season and the end of 2014 approaches, Action for Health in the Americas (AHA) is again seeking your support for the amazing work of Educación Popular en Salud (EPES). I am sure that as you read through the EPES Update, it will become apparent how critical EPES’ work has been not only in Chile but across the globe.

As you read about their work in fighting for stronger tobacco control policies or supporting community rebuilding in Valparaíso, you also may notice that EPES has been fortunate to have the support of larger organizations – such as the ELCA Global Mission, the ACT Alliance and the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. What you may not realize is how indispensable the donations that you make through AHA are to the overall sustainability of all EPES’ programs. While the support of these large funders is crucial, the funds are designated to specific projects. The undesignated general funds are essential to maintaining the core work EPES has done for 32 years to support the dignity and empowerment of women and families in Chile’s poorest communities, by training and working with health promoters. Your support is what keeps this work going.

Since AHA was founded almost a decade ago, we’ve annually supported a significant portion of EPES’ operating budget. For 2014, we have a goal of raising at least $100,000 to support EPES – and while your support throughout the year has brought us close to our goal, we still have $35,000 to go.

I and the rest of the AHA board have faith that we can meet this goal by December 31st! A generous board member has agreed to match up to $10,000 for donations received from now until the end of the year, and in our experience, supporters like you recognize how much your donation makes a difference in keeping EPES going, and consistently and generously give your support. We also hope you’ll consider giving the “gift of EPES” this holiday season – make a donation in a loved one’s name and we will gladly send them a holiday card on your behalf.

As always – thank you, thank you, thank you and gracias, gracias, gracias! On behalf of all of us at AHA and EPES, I wish you a joyful Christmas and a peaceful and happy new year.

Christina Mills MD FRCPC
President, Action for Health in the Americas

EPES Dec 2014 Update cover

Announcing the 6th Annual International Training Course on Popular Education in Health in Chile!

EPES Foundation and AHA are pleased to announce the 6th Annual International Training Course on Popular Education in Health!

2015 Training Course Flyer Picture

Sharing 32 Years of Work for Dignity and Justice in Health Course on
Participatory and Community-based Strategies in Health
January 5-16, 2015  
Santiago and Concepción, Chile

The 12-day training course is a mix of classes, conferences, participatory workshops and opportunities to work alongside the community health groups trained by EPES. We invite you to learn-by-doing, promoting and advancing the right to health using the popular education strategies put into practice by EPES over its 32 years of community action for health and dignity.

The multi-disciplinary team of EPES health educators will be joined by inspiring guest instructors: Pastor Lisandro Orlov, Founder and coordinator (1986) HIV/AIDS Ecumenical Pastoral  Buenos Aires, Argentina; Dr. Marisa Matamala, Latin American and Caribbean Women’s Health Network; former coordinator of the Pan American Health Organization´s Equity, Gender and Health reform program.

This year’s special guest is Lisa Russell, Emmy award-winning documentary filmmaker and public health advocate
. After earning a Master’s degree in Public Health, Lisa turned to documentary film to fight for justice in health. Over more than 10 years, Lisa has produced films, campaigns and projects for United Nation agencies and activist groups.

The course (conducted in Spanish) is designed for undergraduate and graduate public health students and professionals, medical and social science students, educators, community organizers, social workers, women’s studies students, church and global mission workers and activists for social justice and development.

Read the flyer for more information, and contact Karen Anderson ( at EPES for additional details.

EPES looks forward to bringing together people from around the world interested in this unique opportunity to learn and share.

Survivors of Valparaiso firestorm march on Congress to demand decent housing and dignity

Read more about what EPES is doing in the recent EPES Update! To help support the work of EPES – including the recovery in Valparaiso – please give a gift through AHA!

Survivors of Valparaiso firestorm march on Congress to demand decent housing and dignity

By Lezak Shallat, Fundación EPES CHILE

Torrential rains turned the steep streets and ravines of Valparaíso into rivers, and makeshift emergency housing into sieves. On June 11, two months after the firestorm that consumed 3,000 homes and damaged 12,000 more in the Chilean city of Valparaiso, its blackened hills were not ringing with the sounds of hammers; instead, the angry chants of protestors banging pots and pans echoed from hill to hill as the scores of people battled the rain to march down to the gates of the National Congress to demand to decent housing.

Marco Olmedo is clothed in a plastic bag to keep off the rain. His house on Cerro El Litre burned to the ground, and everything in it. Fortunately, he wasn’t there. Unemployed, he had left four days earlier for Argentina to look for work. He saw his neighborhood engulfed in flames on TV news and rushed back to salvage what he could.  He’s living in the makeshift, emergency housing known as “media-aguas” — a one-room, wooden shack with no bathroom. His electricity was only restored today.

Lorena Monroy, President of the Cerro El Litre Neighborhood Council, charges the government with negligence. “It’s impossible that we still are lacking a rapid, definitive and dignified solution.”

“No more emergency shacks in Chile,” demands Mauricio Salazar, director of the Las Cañas Community Center where EPES in focusing its recovery efforts. “They don’t work. That’s our reality.” Salazar denounced “disorganization and rumor” from the authorities in charge of the rebuilding efforts.

“We are here to tell them that we are not going to let them forget about us until we have decent, dignified housing,” he promises, backed by cheers from the crowd. A scuffle with police followed as the protestors momentarily blocked the entrance into Congress, located at the foot of the city’s impoverished hillsides.

Hear Marco, Lorena and Mauricio in their own words.

Health educator Mónica Arancibia, facilitator of the participatory assessment process supported by ACT member Fundación Educación Popular en Salud (EPES), accompanied the marchers and attested to their demands. “In structured conversations, residents are prioritizing their individual and collective needs: weatherproofing the shelters, clean-ups of the communal toilets and showers, a place to wash clothes, garbage pick-up,” she enumerates.

Mónica also cites the contribution of “commitment, support and identity” that EPES is providing. “Like them, I’m a also pobladora (resident of a low-income sector launched in a land takeover on the outskirts of the city). I know what it is like to struggle.”

The EPES-facilitated assessment is shedding light on a host of problems that won’t disappear once the rains stop. “The procedures for assigning and building the emergency housing is sorely lacking in controls,” says Maria Eugenia Calvin, EPES Director of Planning and coordinator of the ACT initiative in Valparaiso. “Boards are missing, nails are missing, the shacks come without locks for the door. The families who are fixing up their homes need skilled builders to oversee the dwindling number of volunteers who have stayed on to help the homeless. But instead of hiring local workmen, the government is bringing in military people to carry out the repairs.”